Gettysburg - 2004

When I was digging through more of my digital photography archive I found even more pics of Gettysburg National Military Park that I’d like to share. These are from all the way back in September 2004!

Near The Angle (marked by the tree in the background) and right behind the visitor’s center you’ll find the spot where Confederate General Lewis Armistead was mortally wounded during the fateful Pickett’s Charge:

Where Armistead fell

Where Armistead fell

Turning to the left of where Armistead fell you'll find the objective to which his brigade marched: the copse of trees. This little grove of trees represents the high water mark of the Confederate's progress in the Civil War.

The high water mark of the Confederacy

The high water mark of the Confederacy

On the Confederate side opposite the copse of trees you'll find the Virginia Memorial along Seminary Ridge:

The Virginia Memorial

The Virginia Memorial

Close by, but in a much less conspicuous location is the Longstreet Monument. Unlike many others, this one sits on the ground and is rather close to life-size. Longstreet is astride his horse "Hero" and is facing in the direction of the Union line on the opposing ridge. People often leave cigars and flowers on the statue itself as an homage (there were several about the statue when I visited):

The Longstreet Monument

The Longstreet Monument

Full view of the Longstreet monument

Full view of the Longstreet monument

Back on the Union ridge, I stopped to grab a shot of the approach to Little Round Top from the Confederate perspective. It looks every bit as intimidating and exposed as I'd read!

The Confederate approach to Little Round Top

The Confederate approach to Little Round Top

The above shot was taken from around Devil's Den, which was rife with activity on the second day of the battle. Here's a view looking East into it:

Devil's Den

Devil's Den

Moving over to Little Round Top from Devil's Den you'll find the 20th Maine Monument which marks the position of the regiment that formed the extreme left flank of the Union line. A little further up the trail marks the left flank of the regiment itself. This ground was extremely important for the Union - the round top hills commanded views of the entirety of the Union line extending northwards. If they fell into Confederate hands that entire line would be compromised with enfilading artillery fire (although there has been debate as to how suitable the ground was for artillery). It had to be held at all costs, which is exactly what Joshua Chamberlain did.

20th Maine Monument

20th Maine Monument

As I was finishing up on Little Round Top and thereabouts the sun was getting low in the sky. It made for another stark picture of the once-residential nature of the battlefield:

Farm house in the distance.

Farm house in the distance.

Here is the full gallery of photos I took that day:

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